Hampton Designer Showhouse 2012: Part Duex






My favorite room in the house was Robert Passel's.  I don't know if it was the floating bed, the inlaid chest, the assorted Stephanie Odegard pieces, the color combination, or the unbelievable customized wallpaper by Black Crow Studio that caused my heart to skip a beat.  I love Robert's designs.  They are always sophisticated and beautifully curated.


somebody was planning on a little fun :-)












Katie Leede & Co. brings a bohemian, multi-textural, multi-ethnic vibe to her bedroom.  It manages to remain restful while still having a lot going on (I think I just described Katie herself).  I'm calling it ~ Out of Africa meets modern Moroccan.


There were many of versions of this work horse, saw horse desk.




Katie's own Menna fabric was applied to the walls, and along with the curtains trimmed in feathers and the woven shades, they helped frame William Sweetlove's Cloned Dog on the front lawn.  His animal sculptures are seen around the Hamptons.  They all sport backpacks and water bottles as a commentary on climate change.  It is not only a beautiful house, but it is making an environmental statement as well.



Tammy Connor, a talented Alabama designer did a twin bedroom and bath with a rustic sensibility.





I liked the artist studio reference.  You obviously would not use a bathroom in this way (as the women in the room with me pointed out), but it's a show house after all, and sometimes you have to suspend disbelief!  I also liked that the stripes were applied in different directions.  What do you think of this application of the wallpaper in the bedroom?






Downstairs in the basement, TV personality Libby Langdon had a huge space to fill, called the fun room.  The propeller cocktail table was a conversation piece.  It was a nice mix of metal surfaces and antiques.  She cleverly had a tape of her on the Rachel Ray show running on the TV.






It's a shame the lighting was uncooperative in the lounge that Greg McKensie designed.  The hip, mod  space was rooted in classicism, but infused with tactile elements that created a visually exciting environment.  You "have me" at malachite, animal hide, lucite and mirror.  The fabric applied to the walls was a knockout.






I have to admit, I did not understand Lee Najman's game room.  I wish I had some explanation, but it did remind me once again of the Hermes store in Paris ~ So, I had a full circle moment.



to refresh your memory: Hermes, Paris






Ph; CLI, except 7 & 8 courtesy Robert Passel


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